System Integrators: a time for changing

From all the players in the digital marketplace the ones suffering the strongest effects of economic downturn and collapse of certainties are for sure System Integrators and Independent Software Vendors: their situation is likely to get even worst in the next months.

In fact, in many respects, the various changes taking place in the landscape of the digital market are significantly restricting their role while, in the meantime, give them also new opportunities.
The explosion of SaaS - vertical pipes of information that connect customers directly with service providers – cuts out of the value chain the System Integrators. And, to be noticed, we are just at the beginning of the *aaS revolutuion.

According to this interesting global survey recently published by Avanade, many customers, besides having invested in certain vertical functions, consider investment in SaaS as differentiators.

SaaS has now conquered almost all functional areas, starting with vertical solutions for needs such as CRM and SFA, ERP, Business Intelligence, project collaboration, team management and issue tracking, to name just a few.  SaaS paradigm is eventually reaching fields that used to be reluctant to permeation, due to security and confidentiality concerns, such as desktop provisioning (IBM) and office suites (with players such as Microsoft and Google).
To complete the picture, emerging disciplines such as ECM and BPM are even remodeling around the SaaS paradigm becoming often the preferred approach (Intalio).
At this time of extreme budget cut , many customers focus on short or very short term, ignoring the drawbacks that the adoption of SaaS can bring in the long term.
From this table, extracted from the interesting CA’s “Security of Cloud Computing Users: A Study of U.S. and Europe IT Practitioners “ , emerges the overwhelming importance of budget related drivers (cost reductions, efficiency) that is transcending security concerns leaving them to be addressed in second place:

There are very few weapons in the hands of a good integrator at today: too often the client wants everything now, just a click away and, being often short-sighted, is unable to identify the medium and long term drawbacks. Besides, SaaS providers often have good arguments, a virtually 100% guaranteed uptime, ultra-aggressive pricing and, in many cases , now offers packaged and efficient on-premise variants to switch on if customers change idea.
In fact, SaaS paradigm, with its very low upfront costs, is the ideal pick to let the customer to produce such a huge amount of data or internal expertise or being no more able to change then the solution, remaining locked up for years.
In addition to safety aspects, the impact that the choice can have in terms of accessibility of data and horizontal application interoperability is often underestimated.

Some questions may be trivial:

  • How to integrate data from different vertical SaaS applications?
  • How to orchestrate different applications into a BPM?
  • How to create a Datamart to be used for traditional DWH?

It must be said that, as always, once the industry identifies a technology gap, it proposes a solution to solve it: the acquisition by IBM’s, of Cast Iron Systems is in fact very recent.

Cast Iron Systems provides pre-configured integration solutions for hundreds of leading enterprise and cloud applications. These solutions, built on the Cast Iron OmniConnect Platform, use the company’s “configuration, not coding” approach to solve the entire lifecycle of your integration needs.

  • UI Mashups — When information from disparate sources needs to be brought together and displayed within the native user interface of a single application, Cast Iron OmniConnect can mashup this data to present a single unified view, without leaving the current application.
  • Process Integration — Companies can use the Cast Iron OmniConnect platform to orchestrate business processes across multiple cloud and
    on-premise applications in real-time.
  • Data Migration — Starting with data integration as the foundation, Cast Iron OmniConnect enables companies to access, cleanse and migrate data from legacy systems to their new SaaS applications in real-time.

Also, Cast Iron is not the only active player in this field: Boomi, the main Cast Iron competitor, commented the deal.

Definitely a disruptive market: just emerged and already has seen several players and the interest (up to an acquisition) of a worldwide IT leader like IBM. Hard to believe that integrators, including medium-large sized, can think of attacking this market, so competitive, if not through acquisitions, just as IBM did.
If we look at the * aas phenomenon from another point of view, the strong momentum of network provisioning solutions, is making also PaaS and IaaS offers maturing quickly: these instruments, unlike the vertical SaaS, provide integrators with clear opportunities, as in the past has been highlighted on this blog: IaaS and Free software.

Not all the problems can find a response with a such low-customizable solution like SaaS: in these cases to know how to create scalable, IaaS based, solutions made by modifying and integrating existing FOSS products, can be a good and competitive advantage over the make or buy approach (old like mammoths).
More can also be achieved through the open frameworks that are suitable for being natively deployed on IaaS infrastructurs such as Spring. These objects can be the fundamental building blocks for simple solutions to complex problems, in discontinuity with what has been done in the past too often: offering complex solutions to simple problems.

However, the trend is very clear: we are moving towards a simple, scalable, automated, self configuring, standards-oriented IT, even attempting to replace the business analyst to the developer. All directions in which ISVs and integrators will have less space and more competition.
Moreover, it’s quite insane to invest on commodities, and IT is more than a serious candidate to become it, if is not already, for the vast majority of customers.

This in itself is not a bad news: it will help to converge on issues of true innovation, which goes beyond saturated fields like IT.
However, returning to assume the role of integrator, how to react? Where are the needs of technical expertise, modeling capabilities, design and integration moving? The immediate answer is: out of the software, towards modular and distributed hardware and embedded systems.

The Internet of Things, sensors, distributed, embedded computing, automation: these are the areas on which you will measure our ability to think, see and realize customers business processes, outside the traditional knowledge and application areas.

New integrators must be able to model integrate customer processes and integrate actors rather than applications and software modules.

No doubt this is the right time to change by aiming to exercise true integration that transcends the pure field of IT caring of distributed intelligent elements and living people.

Tweet thisTweet this

read the rest of this entry for the italian translation.

System Integrators: tempo di cambiare

Tra tutti i player del mercato digitale, quelli che stanno subendo, e che presumibilmente soffriranno ancor più in futuro, i maggiori effetti della crisi economica e del crollo delle certezze sono di sicuro i System Integrators e gli Independent Software Vendor.

Di fatto, sotto molti punti di vista, vari cambiamenti in atto nel panorama del mercato digitale stanno notevolmente restringendo il loro ruolo ma,  nel frattempo, aprono loro alcune nuove opportunità.
Grazie all’esplosione dei SaaS – tubi di informazioni verticali che connettono direttamente i clienti con i provider di servizi – chi viene tagliato fuori dalla catena del valore sono proprio i System integrators. E siamo evidentemente solo agli inizi.

Secondo questo interessante global survey recentemente pubblicato da “Avanade”, molti clienti, oltre ad aver investito su determinate funzioni verticali, considerano gli investimenti sul SaaS come differenziatori.

Il SaaS ha conquistato ormai praticamente tutti i campi funzionali, partendo da soluzioni per esigenze verticali come CRM and SFA, ERP, Business Intelligence,project collaboration, team management and issue tracking, solo per citarne alcuni.  Il paradigma SaaS sta ora definitivamente esplodendo fino a conquistare campi tradizionalmente restii alla permeazione per questioni di sicurezza e confidenzialità, quali il desktop provisioning (IBM) e le office suites (con player del calibro di Microsoft e Google )

Per completare il quadro, discipline tutto sommato emergenti, come l’ECM, e il BPM si stanno addirittura rimodellando attorno al paradigma SaaS adottandolo quasi come approccio preferito (Intalio).

Molti clienti sembrano focalizzare l’attenzione, in questo momento di estrema riduzione di budget, al breve o brevissimo termine, trascurando i drawbacks che l’adozione di SaaS può portare in un’ottica di lungo periodo.

Da questa tabella estratta dall’interessante survey/report di CA “Security of Cloud Computing Users: A Study of U.S. and Europe IT Practitioners” emerge con chiarezza la preponderante importanza di ragioni legate al budget (riduzioni di costo, efficientamento) che spesso travalicano i concern di sicurezza, destinati poi ad essere affrontati in seconda battuta:

Sono pochissime peraltro le armi in mano a un buon integratore di questi tempi. Troppo spesso il cliente vuole tutto e subito, a portata di click, non riuscendo a identificare in maniera miope i drawbacks di medio e lungo periodo. D’altronde i SaaS provider hanno spesso ottimi argomenti, come garanzie di uptime praticamente del 100%, pricing ultra aggressivi e, in molti casi ormai, offerte on premise su cui switchare, in caso i clienti cambino idea, pacchettizzate e efficienti.

Di fatto il paradigma SaaS, grazie ai suoi costi di upfront bassissimi, è il grimaldello ideale per far si che il cliente produca una tale mole di dati o competenza interna da non essere poi in grado di cambiare soluzione, rimanendo bloccato per anni.

Oltre agli aspetti legati alla sicurezza, ritengo infatti che sia spesso sottovalutato l’impatto che la scelta può avere in termini di accessibilità dei dati e interoperabilità applicativa orizzontale. Alcune domande banali potrebbero essere:

  • Come integrare i dati provenienti da diverse applicazioni verticali?
  • Come orchestrare diverse applicazioni in un BPM?
  • Come creare in un Datamart su cui fare tradizionali attività di DWH?

Va detto che, come sempre, l’industria una volta individuato un gap tecnologico propone una soluzione per risolverlo: è recente l’acquisizione, proprio di IBM, di Cast Iron Systems:

Cast Iron Systems provides pre-configured integration solutions for hundreds of leading enterprise and cloud applications. These solutions, built on the Cast Iron OmniConnect Platform, use the company’s “configuration, not coding” approach to solve the entire lifecycle of your integration needs.

  • UI Mashups — When information from disparate sources needs to be brought together and displayed within the native user interface of a single application, Cast Iron OmniConnect can mashup this data to present a single unified view, without leaving the current application.
  • Process Integration — Companies can use the Cast Iron OmniConnect platform to orchestrate business processes across multiple cloud and
    on-premise applications in real-time.

Cast Iron peraltro non è l’unico player attivo in questo campo; Boomi (www.boomi.com), principale competitor di Cast Iron ha commentato in questo modo l’acquisizione http://blogs.boomi.com/bod/2010/05/commentary-on-ibm-websphere-cast-iron-deal.html.  Decisamente un mercato in fermento: appena emerso vede già diversi player e l’interesse (fino ad arrivare a un’acquisizione) di un IT worldwide leader come IBM. Difficile pensare che integratori, anche medio-grandi, possano pensare di aggredire questo mercato, per loro non tradizionale e così competitivo, se non tramite acquisizioni, come appunto ha fatto IBM.

Se guardiamo il fenomeno *aaS da un altro punto di vista, il forte momento delle soluzioni di provisioning da rete, sta facendo maturare molto velocemente anche le offerte PaaS e IaaS: questi strumenti, a differenza delle soluzioni verticali SaaS forniscono agli integratori un’evidente opportunità, come già in passato é stato evidenziato su questo Blog: IaaS e Free software.

Non a tutti i problemi infatti si può rispondere con una soluzione scarsamente customizzabile come i SaaS; in questi casi saper prototipare soluzioni scalabili grazie alle IaaS modificando e integrando prodotti FOSS esistenti, può costituire un buon vantaggio competitivo rispetto all’approccio make or buy a cui siamo stati abituati in tempi che ci sembrano ormai lontani come i mammuth.

Maggiori potenzialità si possono intravedere inoltre grazie agli open frameworks che siano nativamente adatti al deploy su IaaS. Questi oggetti possono costituire i mattoni fondanti di soluzioni semplici a problemi complessi, in discontinuità con quanto è stato fatto in passato troppo spesso: proporre soluzioni complesse a problemi semplici.

Tuttavia il trend è molto chiaro: andiamo verso un IT semplice, scalabile, automatico, auto configurante, orientato agli standards, che tenta addirittura di sostituire l’analista di business allo sviluppatore. Tutte direzioni nelle quali gli ISV e gli integratori avranno meno spazio e più concorrenza.
D’altronde, non si fanno investimenti sulle commodities, e l’IT è un più che serio candidato a diventarlo, se non lo è già, per la stragrande maggioranza dei clienti.

Questa di per sè non è però una cattiva notizia: potrà aiutare a convergere verso tematiche di innovazione vera, che esulino campi saturi come l’IT.

Tornando a vestire i panni dell’ integratore però, come reagire? Dove si sta muovendo il fabbisogno reale di competenza tecnica e capacità di modellazione, design e integrazione? La risposta é immediata: fuori dal recinto del software, verso l’hardware modulare e distribuito, verso i sistemi embedded.

L’Internet of Things, la sensoristica distribuita, l’embedded computing, l’automazione: questi sono i campi su cui si misurerà la nostra capacità di pensare, vedere e realizzare i processi di business dei nostri clienti, fuori dagli ambiti tradizionali.

I nuovi integratori dovranno essere capaci di modellare i processi del cliente e integrare fasi e attori più che applicazioni e moduli software.

Senza dubbio questo è il momento giusto per cambiare puntando a esercitare una vera integrazione che trascenda il puro campo dell’IT e si inoltri nel campo dell’interazione con elementi distribuiti e persone.

About these ads

About meedabyte

Blogger, Wireless strategist and consultant, passionate about innovation, Free and open source enthusiast

One comment

  1. That was remarkable post. I like to read articles that are edifying for they enriched my mind with different knowledge that makes me a better person. These articles especially about recent events, technologies, news, tips and technical skills are the topics that I adore. Keep it up and more power to your website. I look forward for your next article.Thanks Jennifer Liferay Portal Development

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 143 other followers

%d bloggers like this: