Posts Tagged: Wikispeed

The Era of the Lean Corporation

A more accessible market, coupled with new reasons behind entrepreneurship and a new Hacker ethics in management could seriously succeed in transforming the corporate.

Only a company that embraces the waste not, and kai-zen (change for the better) and knows how to develop shared innovation contexts and participatory processes – rather than being monolithic – could assume a changemaking role.

The fourth era of innovation (or fifth perhaps), will be a matter of methods and contexts, efficiency and cooperation.

The corporate that will be thriving in this era will be different in shape and strategy, from the one of today which is too busy designing new complexities to start thinking about the future.

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The Era of the Lean Corporation

A more accessible market, coupled with new reasons behind entrepreneurship and a new Hacker ethics in management could seriously succeed in transforming the corporate.

Only a company that embraces the waste not, and kai-zen (change for the better) and knows how to develop shared innovation contexts and participatory processes – rather than being monolithic – could assume a changemaking role.

The fourth era of innovation (or fifth perhaps), will be a matter of methods and contexts, efficiency and cooperation.

The corporate that will be thriving in this era will be different in shape and strategy, from the one of today which is too busy designing new complexities to start thinking about the future.

Interviewing Joe Justice from Team Wikispeed on the Future of Manufacturing (and Consumption)

Joe Justice is the ideator of Team Wikspeed: a team of volunteers distributed around the world who recently created a prototype car that is open source, modular and ultra-efficient in just three months, using processes borrowed from software development, the world from which Joe comes from. In addition to being a visionary, Joe is a fantastic and discussion prone person and this interview contains a very open and fruitful discussions I had with him at the end of April. I recommend you read it because it will be useful to you to understand how manufacturing – and consumption – are fated to change in coming years if, as Joe says, we want to continue living on this planet for a while.

Interviewing Joe Justice from Team Wikispeed on the Future of Manufacturing (and Consumption)

Joe Justice is the ideator of Team Wikspeed: a team of volunteers distributed around the world who recently created a prototype car that is open source, modular and ultra-efficient in just three months, using processes borrowed from software development, the world from which Joe comes from. In addition to being a visionary, Joe is a fantastic and discussion prone person and this interview contains a very open and fruitful discussions I had with him at the end of April. I recommend you read it because it will be useful to you to understand how manufacturing – and consumption – are fated to change in coming years if, as Joe says, we want to continue living on this planet for a while.

How to make your Company and Products thrive in an Age of Cooperation

As a reader who regularly follows the blog knows, in my latest piece I introduced some new concepts about the theory of niches and, in particular, I focused on showing how communities finally won a productive and inspirative role into the new cooperative product cycle that is gradually establishing. This piece, instead, is mostly about how businesses can thrive by collaborating with communities: means, perspectives, “places” and phases.

How to make your Company and Products thrive in an Age of Cooperation

As a reader who regularly follows the blog knows, in my latest piece I introduced some new concepts about the theory of niches and, in particular, I focused on showing how communities finally won a productive and inspirative role into the new cooperative product cycle that is gradually establishing. This piece, instead, is mostly about how businesses can thrive by collaborating with communities: means, perspectives, “places” and phases.